Maxpedition Tri Carry 6 Review

“Every day carry” or EDC seems to have grown from being primarily about knives or handguns to including whatever other tools or equipment we think we need at our side, including flashlights, multi-tools, reloads, writing instruments, and more. You might carry each of those things on your person one at a time and in a specific location, depending on what you’re wearing. The pen attaches to your shirt pocket, the flashlight goes in your weak hand pocket, and so on. Or, you can carry them all together in a single organizing pocket or pouch which can be easily attached to your belt or carried in a messenger bag or backpack. Maxpedition’s Tri Carry 6 Pouch is one of several of the company’s organizational tools that will not only carry most of your EDC stuff, but also will outlast most of it.

Read the rest of my review at American Handgunner.

Taurus PT 1911 AL-R

markkakkuri taurus pt1911 alr long term 6.jpg

Near the top of my list of Unsung Handgun Heroes resides a Taurus PT 1911 AL-R, a great house gun or car gun with a long list of standard features and, before it was discontinued by Taurus, a decent price tag. At first glance, you might not like it, but I’ll declare that after a few years of use, Taurus’ take on the 1911 makes this classic fighting pistol more useful than ever. If you can find one, you should buy it.

Read the rest of my exclusive review at AmericanHandgunner.com.

Detroit Concealment Holster

Detroit Concealment Holster

Part of what makes America great is not only the Second Amendment but also the free market in which the firearms industry exists. You think you can build a better holster and market it to the American people? Then do it. That’s what Michigan resident Bill Tait did, starting Detroit Concealment (http://detroitconcealment.com) and offering custom thermoplastic holsters and scabbards. The holster you see pictured here is called the “ExFil.” Tucked neatly inside of it is a Glock 19 with a custom slide color treatment and stippling. This gun and this holster (which starts at $55) proved a great combination for concealed carry and offered a solid hold, comfortable ride, good concealment, and easy draw.

Read the rest of my review at Concealed Carry Report.

The Recluse Holster

The Recluse Holster

Carrying a handgun concealed in a pocket offers a few advantages over other methods of concealed carry. Pocket carry can be more comfortable than, say, carrying inside the waistband; pocket carry can allow a hand on the gun but still keeps the gun undrawn, hidden from view; and pocket carry may be the best place to carry not only a traditional revolver but also many of the new, small pistols available today. Pocket carry isn’t perfect, however. It’s difficult to access a gun in a pocket while seated and there’s always the risk of some printing. Of course, pocket holster systems abound that attempt to maximize the advantages and minimize the disadvantages. One pocket holster worth looking at is the aptly named Recluse, in this version a well-designed one-sided holster that keeps a safe hold of the gun—especially guarding the trigger—while helping hide the gun under a wide swath of leather. The Recluse retails for $59.95.

Read the rest of my review at Concealed Carry Report.

by Mark Kakkuri, a freelance journalist covering the firearms industry, guns and gear, the Second Amendment, and more ~ mark@gunwriting.com